Fifth Annual Fox River Summit 2017

Fox River Summit 2017

Fox River Summit: Celebrating SUCCESS & Addressing SHARED CHALLENGES

Building upon the success of the first Fox River Summit that culminated with a unanimous declaration adoption by all attendees present, we are proud to announce that the fifth annual summit will be held on March 10, 2017, and will continue to build alliances, share ideas and issues of concern in the Fox River watershed. Review the declaration here: final-declaration-fox-river-summit-2013.pdf.
Read the Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine article on the Fox River Summit.

Meeting objectives:
  • Share new tools and practices being developed to protect the Fox River watershed among communities in Wisconsin and Illinois.
  • Continue a dialogue on shared challenges concerning recreation, economics, sustainable flows, surface water/groundwater interactions, sediment and ecosystem services.
  • Build trust among stakeholders and identify commonalities, project successes and future challenges within the watershed.
Download and print the 2017 Fox River Summit flyer for your office or storefront.
 

SUMMIT

MARCH 10, 2017
7:30AM TO 4:30PM

Veterans Terrace at Echo Park
589 Milwaukee Avenue
Burlington, WI 53105
www.veteransterrace.com

Sponsored in part by the:

Southeastern Wisconsin Fox River Commission
 

$35.00 ADVANCE REGISTRATION - ONLINE ONLY


Advance registration deadline: March 9, 2017
$50.00 day of, or at the door - cash or check


DOWNLOAD THE 2017 FOX RIVER SUMMIT COMPLETE PROGRAM

REGISTER ONLINE USING THE SECURE PAYPAL PAYMENT GATEWAY
(You can select number of Tickets at PayPal)

Please Provide Affiliation
Attendee Names

Cancellation:
No refunds will be given. You may enroll a substitute at any time before the summit starts, but refunds will not be given for no-shows. Any questions contact Tom Slawski at slawski@sbcglobal.net or 262-953-3263

Keynote Presentation

Eric Compas, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

TESTING THE WATERS: HACKING OUR WAY INTO THE FUTURE OF WATER QUALITY SAMPLING
by Dr. Eric Compas, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Dr. Eric Compas is an Associate Professor in the Geography, Geology, and Environmental Science Department and Director of the GIS Center at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. He also serves as a Board Member on the Rock River Coalition. His research interests include interactive web mapping, environmental policy, and protected areas.

Dr. Compas will present the development of a novel water quality mapping system and the results of an initial 11-day expedition down the Rock River to test the device. The array – largely built with open-source tools – allows for the fine-scale mapping of streams at relatively low cost and holds the possibility of changing how we monitor and understand our surface waters. He also will be demonstrating the device and asking for feedback on the system’s further development.

Presentations

Vince Mosca

MONARCHS AND MARGARITAS
by Vincent J. Mosca, Vice President - Senior Ecologist, Hey and Associates, Inc.

Vince Mosca has been involved with thousands of wetland and ecological assessment projects over the past 28 years in Illinois and Wisconsin. Vince also regularly leads regulatory permitting (local, state, and federal) efforts for both public and private sector projects. He has experience dealing with state and federal endangered species issues, and with all aspects of ecological restoration, particularly wetlands and streams. He brings a particular understanding of ecological processes and values to all projects he is involved with.

Many of his recent projects relate to green infrastructure planning and design for stormwater quality and quantity management. Mr. Mosca graduated from Northland College with a Bachelor of Science in Biophysical Environmental Studies as well as Graduate Studies in Ecosystem Studies at University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

This presentation will discuss the dramatic decline of the iconic insect, the Monarch Butterfly, in recent years and the unique opportunities for North American conservation and cooperation that the butterfly affords through its epic migration to specific highlands in Mexico.

Kristi Minahan, Water Quality Standards Specialist, WDNR

PROPOSED CHANGES TO WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AND HOW THEY DIFFER FROM THE CURRENT STANDARDS IN WISCONSIN
by Kristi Minahan, Water Quality Standards Specialist, WDNR

Kristi Minahan is a Water Quality Standards Specialist with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. She focuses on policy development related to lake and stream classifications and assessments, and is currently leading WDNR’s rulemaking efforts on designated uses, biocriteria, and site-specific criteria for phosphorus.

Kristi has worked with a variety of other program areas at DNR since 2000 including runoff management, water monitoring, and communications. She holds a Master’s degree in Conservation Ecology and Sustainable Development from the University of Georgia-Athens, and a B.S. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

Leonard Dane, Fish Biologist, Deuchler Environmental, Inc.

GREATER REDHORSE AND RIVER REDHORSE STATUS AND DISTRIBUTION IN THE FOX RIVER NEAR AURORA, ILLINOIS
by Leonard Dane, Fish Biologist, Deuchler Environmental, Inc.

Leonard Dane graduated from the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point with a degree in Biology and Water Resources-Fisheries. He has worked for both state and county governments as well as private consultants. Leonard has worked extensively throughout the Midwest conducting fish and other biological monitoring. He is currently a fish biologist for Deuchler Environmental, Inc. in Aurora, IL.

Deuchler Environmental, Inc. (DEI) was contracted by Fox Metro Water Reclamation District (FMWRD) to evaluate the biological condition of the Fox River in the Aurora area. In the sampling conducted by DEI from 2010 through 2015, no River Redhorse were collected but Greater Redhorse were collected throughout the entire study area, both upstream and downstream of the FMWRD combined sewer overflow (CSO) and treated effluent. The collection of Greater Redhorse was significant as it was a new record to the Aurora area of the Fox River as of 2010. The fact that they have been collected every year since 2010 indicated that there is a viable population within the study area. The presence of Greater Redhorse was significant since the species was thought to be extirpated from Illinois at one time. In addition to the study results, this presentation focuses on the habitat characteristics that influence the distribution of the Greater Redhorse within the study area.

Luke Roffler, WDNR

STATE OF THE FISH: RECENT FOX RIVER FISHERIES MONITORING AND PLANS FOR THE FUTURE
by Luke Roffler, Senior Fisheries Biologist, WDNR

Luke Roffler is a Senior Fisheries Biologist with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources covering the inland waters of Racine, Kenosha and Walworth Counties. Luke conducts fisheries monitoring assessments on a variety of local lakes and streams, primarily tracking gamefish abundance, growth and survival to inform future management decisions.

The Fox River system in Racine and Kenosha Counties provides excellent access and fishing experiences for local and visiting anglers. Several recent monitoring surveys and stocking events have provided a well-rounded picture of this valuable resource and opportunities to improve the fish community moving forward. The Fox River is a diverse and fertile system well-suited to the success of several popular gamefish and the wide variety of non-game species that reside there. Luke’s presentation will detail recent monitoring and stocking results, as well as a vision for the future.

Kyla Jacobsen

ALGAE BLOOMS AND DRINKING WATER CHALLENGES IN THE FOX RIVER
by Kyla Jacobsen, Elgin, IL Water Director

Kyla Jacobsen is the Water Director for the City of Elgin, formerly the Chief Chemist in charge of water quality. She is very active in local watershed groups – Friends of the Fox River, Tyler Creek Watershed Coalition, Fox River Study Group – where she strives to improve the Fox River Water Quality. Kyla received her BS in Chemistry from Southern Illinois University, MS in Biochemistry from Northern Illinois University, and a MS in Environmental Engineering from IIT.

She has been an active member of the American Water Works Association for 30 years. The AWWA is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life. Kyla is the past chair of the Illinois Section AWWA (ISAWWA) and past National Board Director.

She remains involved in many ISAWWA committees and currently serves as the chair of the Water Utility Council which has the responsibility of promoting an effective legislative and regulatory environment for the water community.

Kyla will focus her discussion on Taste & Odor challenges experienced by the city of Elgin. These T&O events are directly attributable to algae in the Fox River, Elgin’s drinking water source.

WI-IL FOX RIVER WATER TRAIL
by Karen Miller AICP, Kane County Development Department & Rebecca Ewald, Administrator, Village of Waterford

The Fox River Water Trail Core Development Team include: Barbara Messick, Karen Miller, Rebecca Ewald, Angie Tornes, Greg Farnham, Richard Kania, Tom Slawski, Greg Taylor and Brian Daly. (Greg and Brian pictured separately). The vision of a water trail on the Fox River is growing clearer as a core development team works toward realization of the WI-IL Fox River Water Trail. Team members from Wisconsin and Illinois will share the vision, mission, and goals for developing the trail.

A technical assistance grant from the National Park Service’s Rivers Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program is providing guidance to the team, which is currently collecting access site information, dam, and segment data. Once this information is gathered team members will then be turning attention to the role of organizations, municipalities, and counties, paddling enthusiasts, environmentalists, and others interested in taking part in public workshops to assist in developing the 223 mile water trail from Lisbon, Wisconsin to Ottawa, Illinois.

Nippersink Creek Watershed

NIPPERSINK CREEK WATERSHED... (STILL) GETTING PROJECTS DONE!
by Randy Stowe, Nippersink Creek Watershed Manager

Randy Stowe is an environmental planner and contractor with 32 years of experience planning, designing, and constructing water quality BMP’s and stream corridor projects in seven states across the eastern United States. Randy is typically involved in all phases of a project, ranging from initial assessment and design, grant writing, securing permits, and on most projects, operating the construction equipment.

Randy was the principal author of the USEPA funded Nippersink Creek Watershed Plan, and serves as the watershed manager for the Nippersink Watershed Association. Randy also serves as the lake manager of Wonder Lake, an 830 acre on-line impoundment on Nippersink Creek, where he is currently coordinating a $7.9 million dredging project. www.nippersink.org

Brad Steckart, Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator, Washington and Waukesha Counties

RESULTS OF A DIVER-ASSISTED SUCTION HARVESTING APPROACH TO STARRY STONEWORT IN 2015 AND CURRENT MONITORING EFFORTS IN SE WISCONSIN
by Brad Steckart, Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator, Washington and Waukesha Counties

Bradley Steckart is the Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator for Washington and Waukesha Counties. Brad earned a BS in biology with a minor in conservation biology from the University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point. An internship in college sparked his interest in the importance of water quality. Since then, he has dedicated his career to the healthy stewardship of freshwater resources.

This presentation will focus on the steps taken over the last two years in response to starry stonewort (Nitellopsis obtusa) in Silver Lake, Washington County, Wisconsin. A rapid response grant allowed Washington County to employ a mechanical management technique called Diver Assisted Suction Harvesting (DASH) to remove starry stonewort from the lake. Brad Steckart, the Washington and Waukesha County Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator will outline the actions taken to delimit this exotic population. Necessary partnerships between the WI-DNR, Washington County, Silver Lake PRD, and EcoWaterway Services, as well as future monitoring efforts and implications will be discussed.

Kyle Magyera, Wisconsin Wetlands Association

PUTTING WETLANDS TO WORK FOR YOUR COMMUNITY
by Kyle Magyera, Wisconsin Wetlands Association

Kyle Magyera is a Local Government Outreach Specialist for the Wisconsin Wetlands Association (WWA), where he primarily develops and delivers tools and trainings to help Wisconsin communities improve consideration of wetlands in land use policy, planning, and implementation. He is the co-author of WWA’s Land Use and Wetlands Publication Series, including a new Model Wetland Conservation Ordinance. Kyle holds Master’s of Science degrees in both Urban and Regional Planning and Water Resources Management from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Healthy wetland landscapes contribute to the health, safety, and livability of nearly every Wisconsin community. This presentation will share perspectives on how wetlands benefit our communities. The talk will focus on options for locally-led wetland conservation and wetland management approaches that can be used to improve lake and river health. Emphasis will be placed on a new Model Wetland Conservation Ordinance. This ordinance is a model that could be used to improve communities' ability to: respond to increasing frequency and intensity of severe weather and flood risks; improve water quality; and protect vulnerable roads, culverts, and other infrastructure.

James E. Kleinschmidt, Baxter & Woodman

THE ILLINOIS FOX RIVER GROUP - 2017 UPDATE
by James E. Kleinschmidt, Baxter & Woodman

Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are potentially facing “brick and mortar” costs over a twenty year period of more than $200,000,000. The founding members of the Illinois Fox River Group believe that prior to making investments of this magnitude they had an obligation to their communities to make sure the expenditure is necessary based on the current conditions in the Fox River. Founding members include Burlington, Western Racine County Sewerage District, East Troy, Town of Norway Sanitary District, Eagle Lake Sanitary District and Town of Lyons Sanitary District 2.

These communities represent six of the 11 municipal facilities on the lower Fox River (South of Mukwonago). This group will be developing a work plan to test the chemistry in the river to assess the current conditions and conducting biological investigations (fish and macroinvertebrates) to determine the condition of the Fox River. The work plan will evolve over the next couple of years since administrative code rules will be required prior to beginning the detailed site work. This presentation will highlight water chemistry sampling efforts in 2016. Additional sampling is planned for 2017 to improve the knowledge of water chemistry in the lower Fox basin. The group will be actively seeking additional partners to help with this effort.

Jim Stute, Research Director - Michael Fields Agricultural Institute

ENGAGING FARMERS IN OUR COVER CROP WORK
by Jim Stute, Research Director - Michael Fields Agricultural Institute

Jim is the Research Director at MFAI. His research focus is on the role of cover crops in soil quality and nutrient management and works to develop best management practices and document the economic impact of cover crops to increase farmer adoption. He is a Certified Professional Agronomist, Certified Crop Advisor and previously served as a UW-Extension Educator in Rock County. He also farms near Troy Center in the Mukwonago River Watershed using cover crops in a 100% no-till system.

The goal of most applied cover crop research and outreach work is farmer adoption. Farmer involvement is critical in designing projects that yield usable results that will increase adoption. The Wisconsin Cover Crop Workgroup uses several strategies to engage farmers which will be discussed at the Summit.

Nancy Turyk, Water Resource Scientist - UW-Stevens Point

EMPLOYING SOCIAL MARKETING AND CREATING CONNECTIONS TO IMPROVE SHORELAND HEALTH
by Nancy Turyk, Water Resource Scientist - UW-Stevens Point

Nancy Turyk has worked as a Water Resource Scientist in the Center for Watershed Science and Education at UW-Stevens Point since 2001. She assists communities and lake/river stewardship groups with science-based solutions to water resource issues. University students and citizen scientists are frequently involved with her research and community-based planning.

Having an understanding about the interests and motivations of the people you would like to work with is critical to linking them to your efforts. Survey responses from shoreland residents with moderately disturbed shorelands indicated that many have a self-affirmation bias when asked to objectively evaluate their shorelands. Their view, that their own shorelands are in a healthier state then actual conditions, can result in a breakdown in communication with those that are encouraging shoreland restoration. This insight was applied in a unique neighbor-to-neighbor shoreland communication program. The outcomes of both studies will be discussed in this session. Download the Presentation Manuscript

Sarah Marquart, National Weather Service - Milwaukee/Sullivan, WI

FOX RIVER INUNDATION MAPPING PROJECT
by Sarah Marquart, National Weather Service - Milwaukee/Sullivan, WI

Sarah Marquardt is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service where she does weather and river forecasting.

This presentation will discuss the Fox River Inundation Mapping Project, done in collaboration with the DNR. Flood inundation maps have been created for NWS river forecast points on the Fox River. These interactive maps are hosted on the NWS website and correspond to NWS levels of minor, moderate, and major flooding.

 
Candice Bauer, USEPA

WATER QUALITY STANDARDS: ILLINOIS NUTRIENT SCIENCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE UPDATE
by Candice Bauer, USEPA

This presentation will start with a description of the Illinois Nutrient Reduction Framework Strategy. This Strategy includes development of a science based technical assessment of: current conditions in Illinois of nutrient sources and export by rivers in the state from point and non-point sources; methods that could be used to reduce these losses and estimates of their effectiveness; and estimates of the costs of statewide and watershed level application of these methods to reduce nutrient losses to meet pollutant load reduction goals.

The second part of this presentation will focus on the formation of the advisory committee to develop nutrient criteria recommendations for Illinois.

 
 
   
 
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